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17 Special Operations Squadron

In accordance with Chapter 3 of AFI 84-105, commercial reproduction of this emblem is NOT permitted without the permission of the proponent organizational/unit commander.

In accordance with Chapter 3 of AFI 84-105, commercial reproduction of this emblem is NOT permitted without the permission of the proponent organizational/unit commander.

Lineage. 17 Reconnaissance Squadron (Bombardment) (constituted as 17 Observation Squadron [Light] on 5 Feb 1942; activated on 2 Mar 1942; redesignated as: 17 Observation Squadron on 4 Jul 1942; 17 Reconnaissance Squadron [Bombardment] on 2 Apr 1943; inactivated on 27 Apr 1946) consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with the 17 Liaison Squadron (constituted on 19 Sep 1952; activated on 20 Oct 1952; inactivated on 25 Sep 1953) and 17 Special Operations Squadron (constituted on 11 Apr 1969; activated on 1 Jun 1969; inactivated on 30 Sep 1971). Activated on 1 Aug 1989.

 

Assignments. 71 Observation (later, 71 Reconnaissance; 71 Tactical Reconnaissance; 71 Reconnaissance) Group, 2 Mar 1942 (attached to 91 Reconnaissance Wing, c. 21 Oct–9 Nov 1945, and to V Bomber Command, 10 Nov 1945–31 Jan 1946); V Bomber Command, 1 Feb–27 Apr 1946. Western Air Defense Force, 20 Oct 1952–25 Sep 1953. 14 Special Operations Wing, 1 Jun 1969–30 Sep 1971. 353 Special Operations Wing (later, 353 Special Operations Group) 1 Aug 1989–.

 

Stations. Providence, RI, 2 Mar 1942; Salinas AAB, CA, 2 Mar 1942; Esler Field, LA, 24 Jan 1943; Laurel AAFld, MS, 31 Mar–24 Sep 1943; Milne Bay, New Guinea, 6 Nov 1943; Dobodura, New Guinea, 22 Nov 1943; Finschhafen, New Guinea, Mar–30 Jun 1944 (air echelon at Wakde, 25 May–10 Jun 1944, and at Biak after 27 Jun 1944); Biak, 29 Jul 1944; Tacloban, Leyte, 2 Nov 1944 (air echelon primarily at Biak to c. 23 Dec 1944 and at San Jose, Mindoro, after 23 Dec 1944); San Jose, Mindoro, 7 Jan 1945; Lingayen, Luzon, 4 Apr 1945; Ie Shima, 29 Jul 1945 (detachment at Lingayen, Luzon, to Sep 1945); Yokota AB, Japan, 26 Oct 1945–27 Apr 1946. McChord AFB, WA, 20 Oct 1952–25 Sep 1953. Nha Trang AB, South Vietnam, 1 Jun 1969; Phan Rang AB, South Vietnam, 15 Aug 1969–30 Sep 1971. Kadena AB, Japan, 1 Aug 1989–.

 

Aircraft.  L–1, O–46, O–47, and O–52, 1942; A–20, P–39, and P–40, 1942–1943; B–25,

1943–1946. None, 1952–1953. AC–119, 1969–1971. HC–130, 1989–.

 

Operations.  Antisubmarine patrols off west coast of US, c. May–c. Sep 1942; Combat in Southwest and Western Pacific, 28 Jan 1944–25 Jul 1945. Not manned, 1952–1953. Combat in Southeast Asia, 1 Jun 1969–30 Sep 1971. Disaster relief missions in the Philippines, 16–31 Jul 1990.  Other special operations missions as necessary in the 1990s. 

 

Service Streamers.  None.

 

Campaign Streamers.  World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; New Guinea; Bismarck Archipelago; Western Pacific; Leyte;

Luzon; Southern Philippines; Ryukyus; China Offensive. Vietnam: TET 69/Counteroffensive; Vietnam Summer-Fall, 1969; Vietnam Winter-Spring, 1970; Sanctuary Counteroffensive; Southwest Monsoon; Commando Hunt V; Commando Hunt VI.

 

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers.  None.

 

Decorations.  Distinguished Unit Citations: Dutch New Guinea, 8 Jun 1944; Philippine

Islands, 26 Dec 1944. Presidential Unit Citation: Southeast Asia, 1–30 Jun 1969. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Combat “V” Device: 1 Jul 1970–30 Jun 1971; 2 Sep 2004-1 Sep 2006; 1 Oct 2006-30 Sep 2008. Meritorious Unit Awards: 1 Oct 2010-30 Sep 2012; 1 Oct 2012-30 Sep 2014.  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: [1 Aug] 1989–5 Apr 1991; 1 Jun 1993-31 May 1995; 1 Sep 1995-31 Aug 1997; 16 Oct 1998-31 May 2000; 13 Oct 2000-1 Sep 2002; 2 Sep 2002-1 Sep 2004; 1 Oct 2008-30 Sep 2010. Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (WWII). Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 1 Jun 1969–30 Sep 1971.

 

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 2 Nov 2016.

 

Aircraft and Operations through 1993.

 

Emblem approved on 19 Jul 1993.  Newest rendition approved on 21 Dec 2011. 

 

Prepared by Daniel L. Haulman.