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86 Airlift Wing (USAFE)

In accordance with Chapter 3 of AFI 84-105, commercial reproduction of this emblem is NOT permitted without the permission of the proponent organizational/unit commander.

In accordance with Chapter 3 of AFI 84-105, commercial reproduction of this emblem is NOT permitted without the permission of the proponent organizational/unit commander.

Lineage.  Established as 86 Fighter Wing, and activated, on 1 Jul 1948.  Redesignated as: 86 Fighter-Bomber Wing on 20 Jan 1950; 86 Fighter-Interceptor Wing on 9 Aug 1954; 86 Air Division (Defense) on 18 Nov 1960.  Inactivated on 14 Nov 1968.  Redesignated as: 86 Fighter-Interceptor Wing on 14 Nov 1968; 86 Tactical Fighter Wing on 13 Oct 1969.  Activated on 1 Nov 1969.  Redesignated as: 86 Fighter Wing on 1 May 1991; 86 Wing on 1 Jun 1992; 86 Airlift Wing on 1 Oct 1994.

Assignments.   United States Air Forces in Europe, 1 Jul 1948; 2 Air Division, 10 Oct 1949; Twelfth Air Force, 7 May 1951; United States Air Forces in Europe, 1 Jan 1958; Seventeenth Air Force, 15 Nov 1959; United States Air Forces in Europe, 1 Jul 1963; Seventeenth Air Force, 1 Sep 1963; United States Air Forces in Europe, 20 May 1965; Seventeenth Air Force, 5 Oct–14 Nov 1968.  Seventeenth Air Force, 1 Nov 1969; 316 Air Division, 14 Jun 1985; Seventeenth Air Force, 1 May 1991; Third Air Force, 31 Jul 1996; United States Air Forces in Europe, 1 Nov 2005; Air Command Europe, 18 Nov 2005; Third Air Force (Air Forces Europe), 1 Dec 2006-.

 

Operational Components.   Group. 86 Fighter (later, 86 Fighter-Bomber; 86 Fighter-Interceptor; 86 Tactical Fighter; 86 Operations): 1 Jul 1948–8 Mar 1958; 22 Sep 1975–14 Jun 1985; 1 May 1991–.  Squadrons. 7 Special Operations: 31 Jan–15 Mar 1973 (detached). 17 Tactical Reconnaissance: 12 Jan 1970–31 Jan 1973. 32 Fighter-Interceptor: 8 Apr 1960–1 Nov 1968. 38 Tactical Reconnaissance: attached 16–30 Jan 1973. 81 Tactical Fighter: attached 12 Jun–14 Jul 1971, assigned 15 Jul 1971–15 Jan 1973. 151 Fighter-Interceptor: 25 Nov 1961–11 Jul 1962. 197 Fighter-Interceptor: 25 Nov 1961–11 Jul 1962. 417 Tactical Fighter: 15 Nov 1981–15 Sep 1987. 434 Tactical Fighter: attached 30 Sep–12 Dec 1961. 435 Tactical Fighter: attached 22 Sep 1961–14 Jan 1962 and 4 Nov–12 Dec 1962. 436 Tactical Fighter: attached 12 Jan–12 Apr 1962. 440 Fighter-Interceptor: attached 1 Jul 1954–7 Oct 1955; attached 10 Aug 1956–7 Mar 1958, assigned 8 Mar 1958–1 Jan 1960. 476 Tactical Fighter: attached 12 Apr–8 Aug 1962. 496 Fighter-Interceptor: attached 1 Jul 1954–7 Oct 1955; attached 10 Aug 1956–7 Mar 1958, assigned 8 Mar 1958–1 Nov 1968. 512 Fighter-Interceptor (later, 512 Tactical Fighter): 24 Mar 1958–1 Jul 1959; 14 Jun 1985–1 May 1991. 513 Fighter-Interceptor: 25 Apr 1958–8 Jan 1961. 514 Fighter-Interceptor: 15 May 1958–Jan 1961. 525 Fighter-Interceptor: attached 22 May 1957–7 Oct 1955; attached 10 Aug 1956–Mar 1958, assigned 8 Mar 1958–1 Nov 1968. 526 Fighter-Interceptor (later, 526 Tactical Fighter): attached 22 May 1954–7 Oct 1955; attached 10 Aug 1956–7 Mar 1958, assigned 8 Mar 1958–1 Nov 1968; assigned 31 Jan 1973–22 Sep 1975; assigned 14 Jun 1985–1 May 1991.  527 Fighter-Interceptor: attached 22 May 1954–7 Oct 1955.

 

Stations.  Neubiberg AB, Germany, 1 Jul 1948; Landstuhl (later, Ramstein–Landstuhl; Ramstein) AB, Germany, 21 Aug 1952–14 Nov 1968. Zweibrucken AB, Germany, 1 Nov 1969; Ramstein AB, Germany, 31 Jan 1973–.

 

Commanders.  Col Clarence T. Edwinson, 1 Jul 1948; Col John S. Chennault, 31 May 1949; Col George R. Bickell, 16 Jun 1952; Col James O. Beckwith, 19 Jan 1955; Col Albert L. Evans Jr., 8 Jun 1956; Col James W. Little, 9 Jun 1958; Col Charles M. Young, 30 Jun 1958; Col Robert J. Rogers, 4 Jul 1959; Col George W. Rogers, 15 Mar 1961; Brig Gen Frank W. Gillespie, 30 Jun 1961; Brig Gen Thomas L. Hayes Jr., 10 Jul 1964; Brig Gen James M. Vande Hey, 12 Jan 1966; Brig Gen Richard N. Ellis, 28 Jun 1967–14 Nov 1968.  Col Howard A. Jones, 1 Nov 1969; Col Wilbur L. Creech, 31 Dec 1969; Col Walter L. Doerty Jr., 17 Nov 1970; Col John J. Knight, 1 Oct 1971; Col James E. McInerney Jr., 19 Oct 1971; Brig Gen William F. Georgi, 31 Jan 1973; Col Edward J. Campbell, 13 Apr 1973; Col Lloyd C. Ulrich, 13 May 1974; Brig Gen Cornelius Nugteren, 22 Aug 1975; Brig Gen John H. Bennett, 15 Jul 1977; Brig Gen Harry Falls Jr., 6 Aug 1979; Col David M. Goodrich, 22 Jan 1980; Brig Gen Jerry W. Tietge, 28 Feb 1980; Maj Gen Robert C. Oaks, 28 Jul 1981; Brig Gen Ralph E. Havens, 24 May 1983; Col Clifford R. Krieger, 9 Jul 1985; Col Joseph S. Rodero, 13 Apr 1987; Col James I. Mathers, 16 Nov 1987; Col George W. Norwood, 17 Mar 1989; Col Roger E. Carleton, 23 Feb 1990; Brig Gen Richard T. Swope, 1 May 1991; Col Gary R. Bendlin, 29 Jun 1992; Brig Gen Tad J. Oelstrom, 3 Nov 1992; Brig Gen Jeffery S. Pilkington, 9 Jul 1993; Brig Gen William E. Stevens, 30 Jun 1995; Col Edward F. McPhillips Jr. (interim), 29 May 1996; Brig Gen John W. Brooks, 3 Jun 1996; Brig Gen Michael W. Wooley, 13 Jul 1998; Brig Gen Mark A. Volcheff, 24 Jan 2000; Brig Gen Erwin F. Lessel, May 2002; Brig Gen Robert C. Kane, Jan 2004; Brig Gen Richard C. Johnston, Apr 2006; Brig Gen William J. Bender, Dec 2007; Brig Gen Mark C. Dillon, Jul 2009; Brig Gen Charles K. Hyde, 2 Sep 2011; Brig Gen Patrick X. Mordente; 8 May 2013; Brig Gen Jon T. Thomas, 19 Jun 2015; Brig Gen Richard G. Moore Jr., 17 Aug 2016-.

 

Aircraft.   F-47, 1948–1950; F-84, 1950–1953; F-86, 1953–1960; F-102, 1959–1968; F-100, 1960; F-104, 1961–1962.  RF-4, 1970–1973, 1976; F-4, 1971–1986; F-100, 1975; F-16, 1985–1994; C-135, 1992; C-12, 1992–1994; C-20, 1992–2017; C-21, 1992–; CT-43, 1992–1996; UH-1, 1992-1993; C-9, 1993-2001; C-130, 1994-; C-37, 2000-; C-40, 2004-.  

 

Operations.   Provided air defense, primarily in West Germany, Jul 1948–Nov 1968, initially as a wing but later as a division. During its eight years as an air division, the organization supervised the improvement of a manual radar system to a semi-automatic air weapons control system. From Nov 1969 to Jun 1971, it was charged only with tactical reconnaissance, but added tactical fighter operations later in 1971. Supported numerous military units located in the area of Ramstein AB, Germany, Jan 1973–Jun 1985. Participated in numerous exercises that provided the wing with air combat tactics training essential to its mission.  Converted to the F–16 Fighting Falcon, 1985– 1986. Beginning in Apr 1991, deployed to Turkey and supported operations in Southwest Asia to ensure that Iraq complied with treaty terms by enforcing a no-fly zone.  Wing aircraft sometimes attacked Iraqi surface-to-air missile (SAM) sites in northern Iraq.  Added an airlift mission in Jun 1992, performing special airlift missions with various kinds of transport aircraft, but retaining fighter aircraft as well.  In 1993 and 1994, the wing deployed pilots, maintenance personnel, and aircraft to Aviano AB, Italy, to enforce a new no-fly zone over Bosnia-Herzegovina.  Two wing F-16 pilots shot down four enemy aircraft in the zone in 1994.  The wing also airlifted humanitarian cargo to Bosnia-Herzegovina between 1993 and 1996.  In 1994, traded its F-16 fighters for C-130 transports and became strictly an airlift wing.  Airlifted troops and cargo to Bosnia-Herzegovina between 1996 and 1998 in support of peacekeepers.  Evacuated U.S. and third-country nationals from Liberia during civil disturbances there in the spring of 1996; in 1997, airlifted African peacekeeping forces to Liberia.  In 1998, the wing supported the airlift of U.S. forces to Southwest Asia after the Iraqi government refused cooperation with United Nations weapons inspectors.  After a terrorist bomb exploded at a U.S. embassy in Kenya in August 1998, the wing supported the medical evacuation of injured personnel.  When the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) used air power in a brief war to end Serbia’s suppression of ethnic Albanians in Kosovo in 1999, the wing airlifted U.S. forces within the European theater and transported relief supplies to refugees in Albania and Macedonia.  After the war the wing airlifted cargo and peacekeepers to Kosovo.  Also furnished humanitarian relief by airlift to the victims of an earthquake in Turkey in 1999 and a flood in Mozambique in 2000.  Later in the year, the wing airlifted victims of the terrorist bombing of the USS Cole from Yemen.  Continued to provide airlift support for air units enforcing the no-fly zone over northern Iraq.  Conducted airlift, airdrop, and aeromedical evacuation operations, 2000-.   Continued to provide airlift support for air units enforcing the no-fly zone over northern Iraq. In 2002 and 2003, the wing supported Operation ENDURING FREEDOM by establishing a forward operating base in the Republic of Kyrgyzstan to support the United States and allied forces fighting the Global War on Terrorism; and provided support to forces in Afghanistan in Operation ANACONDA.  It also served as the primary theater airlift hub for Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, established a forward operating base in northern Iraq to support aircraft sorties and a Contingency Aeromedical Staging Facility.  Other operations supported included SOUTHERN WATCH, NORTHERN WATCH, ENDURING FREEDOM, JOINT FORGE and JOINT GUARDIAN. In 2004 and 2005 the wing added Operation AFRICAN MOVEMENT in the Sudan to assist in stabilizing the Darfur region while moving equipment and peacekeeping forces into Rwanda.  Support for Operation JOINT GUARDIAN  and Operation IRAQI FREEDOM continued from 2008- 2011, and Operation ENDURING FREEDOM through 2014.  From 2014 through 2016, responded to the West African Ebola outbreak and spearheaded the initial airlift of humanitarian and medical supplies for the efforts to contain the deadly epidemic.  It also deployed assets to Turkey in support of Operation INHERENT RESOLVE to support combat missions in the region.  Conducted airlift, airdrop, and aeromedical evacuation operations, 2000-.
 

Service Streamers.  None.

 

Campaign Streamers. None.

 

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers.  None.

 

Decorations.   Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Combat “V” Device: 15 Jan 2004-31 Oct 2005.  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 31 Oct 1955–31 Oct 1958; 1 Jul 1964–30 Jun 1965; 1 Jul 1981–30 Jun 1982; 14 Jun 1985–13 Jun 1987; 1 May 1989–30 Apr 1991; 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1995; 1 Jul 1996-30 Jun 1997; 1 Sep 1997-31 Aug 1999; [14 Apr]-10 Jun 1999; 1 Jan 2000-31 Dec 2001; 1 Jan-31 Dec 2002; 1 Jan-31 Dec 2003; 1 Nov 2005-31 Dec 2006; 1 Jan-31 Dec 2007; 1 Jan-31 Dec 2008; 1 Jul 2009-31 Dec 2010; 1 Jan 2014-31 Dec 2015.

 

Bestowed Honors.  Authorized to display honors earned by the 86 Operations Group prior to 1 Jul 1948.  Service Streamers. World War II American Theater.  Campaign Streamers. World War II: Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Anzio; Rome-Arno; Southern France; North Apennines; Rhineland; Central Europe; Air Combat, EAME Theater.  Decorations. Distinguished Unit Citations: Italy, 25 May 1944; Germany, 20 Apr 1945.

 

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 13 Apr 2018.

 

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 13 Apr 2018. 

 

Supersedes statement prepared on 7 Apr 2010.

 

Emblem.  Approved for 86 Group on 17 Oct 1942 and, in modified form, for 86 Wing on 27 Jul 1956.  Newest rendition approved on 24 Jul 2007.

 

Prepared by Maria Forte.

 

Reviewed by Carl E. Bailey.