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4 Reconnaissance Squadron (ACC)

4RS

In accordance with Chapter 3 of AFI 84-105, commercial reproduction of this emblem is NOT permitted without the permission of the proponent organizational/unit commander.

Lineage.  Constituted as 4 Observation Squadron on 22 Nov 1940.  Activated on 1 Apr 1941.  Redesignated as:  4 Observation Squadron (Medium) on 26 Feb 1942; 4 Observation Squadron on 4 Jul 1942; 4 Reconnaissance Squadron (Special) on 25 Jun 1943; 4 Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron on 20 May 1944; 4 Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, Photo-Jet, on 17 Jun 1948.  Inactivated on 14 Mar 1949.  Redesignated as 4 Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, and activated, on 25 Oct 1966.  Organized on 18 Nov 1966.  Inactivated on 15 Oct 1971.  Redesignated as 4 Expeditionary Reconnaissance Flight, converted to provisional status, and activated, on 31 Jan 2005.  Inactivated on 7 Jul 2005.  Redesignated as 4 Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron on 16 May 2007.   Activated on 26 Jun 2009.  Inactivated on 1 Oct 2014.  Redesignated as 4 Reconnaissance Squadron, and withdrawn from provisional status, on 21 Jul 2020.  Activated on 23 Jul 2020. 

Assignments.  13 Composite Wing, 1 Apr 1941; Puerto Rican Department, 11 Jul 1941; 72 Observation Group, 29 Mar 1942 (attached to Puerto Rican Department, 29 Mar 1942-23 Mar 1943, and to Antilles Air Task Force, 23 Mar-1 Jun 1943); Antilles Air Command, 1 Jun 1943; Caribbean Air Command, 25 Aug 1946 (attached to Provisional Composite Reconnaissance Group, 1 Feb-28 Jul 1948); 6 Fighter Wing, 1 Jun 1948; 5620 Group, 26 Jul 1948; 5600 (later 5600 Composite) Wing, 20 Aug 1948-14 Mar 1949.  75 Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, c. 18 Nov 1966; 67 Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, 15 Jul-15 Oct 1971.  332 Expeditionary Operations Group, 31 Jan -7 Jul 2005.  451 Expeditionary Operations Group, 26 Jun 2009; 455 Expeditionary Operations Group, 23 Nov 2009-1 Oct 2014.  319 Operations Group, 23 Jul 2020-.

Stations.  Ponce Air  Base (later, Losey Field), Puerto Rico, 1 Apr 1941; Borinquen Field, Puerto Rico, 27 Oct 1943; Coolidge Field, Antigua, 21 May 1945; Borinquen Field, Puerto Rico, 5 Oct 1945; Rio Hato, Panama, 20 Aug 1946; France Field (later, AFB), Canal Zone, 1 Dec 1947; Howard AFB, Canal Zone, 20 Aug 1948-14 Mar 1949.  Bergstrom AFB, TX, 18 Nov 1966-15 Oct 1971.  Balad, Iraq, 31 Jan-7 Jul 2005.  Kandahar, Afghanistan, 26 Jun 2009; Bagram, Afghanistan, 23 Nov 2009-1 Oct 2014.  Andersen AFB, Guam, 23 Jul 2020-.

Commanders.  1Lt Cecil L. Wells, 1 Apr 1941; Lt Col Eugene H. Rice, 1 May 1941; Lt Col Willard W. Lazarus, 25 Feb 1942; Capt Elmer A. Dixon, 29 Jan 1943; Capt Richard L. Rider, 29 Mar 1943; Maj Gerard F. Markey, 11 Jun 1943; Maj Bertram S. Petersen, 25 Feb 1944; 1Lt George M. Ries, Dec 1944; Maj Bertram S. Petersen, Dec 1944; Capt William F. Monzel, 20 Dec 1944; Capt Alberto A. Nido, Jun 1945; Maj William F. Monzel, Jun 1945; Capt Edward M. Fritsch, Dec 1945; 1Lt Erwin K. Priwer, c. 2 Jan 1946; Capt Ronald G. Rutt, c. 26 Aug 1946; Capt Russell J. Nash, Oct 1946; Capt Valentine W. Krug, 24 Jan 1947; 1Lt Homer H. Houghton, c. 26 Oct 1947; 1Lt Thomas F. Barton, Nov 1947; Capt William M. Gates, 15 Dec 1947; Capt Valentine W. Krug, 20 Dec 1947-unkn.  Col Robert O. Crabtree, 18 Nov 1966; Lt Col Fred W. Wright, c. Aug 1967; Lt Col Gustav B. Klatt, by 30 Jun 1969; Lt Col Dannie T. Waddle Jr., by 30 Sep-15 Oct 1971.

Aircraft.  O-47, 1941-1945; O-49, 1941-1945; O-52, 1941-1944, B-18, 1943-1945; L-4, 1943-1945; UC,-78, 1943-1945; P-39, 1943-1945; B-25, 1944-1946; B-26, 1944-1945; F-5, 1945-1946; C-25, 1946-1947; C-47, 1946-1947; CQ-3, 1946-1947; PQ-14, 1946-1947; F-6, 1947-1948; FP (later RF)-80, 1947-1949.  RF-4C, 1966-1971.

Operations.  The Squadron trained from Apr 1941-Oct 1943 to support ground forces under the 13 Composite Wing alert plan, taking part in maneuvers, towing targets, and tracking missions to train and test installations in the Caribbean.  Its simulated interceptions of B-29s influenced the Second Air Force to use Borinquen Field as a base for training heavy bombardment combat crews on long over-water missions.  In mid-May 1945, the 4th was equipped with F-5G aircraft and moved to Antigua in the British West Indies where it flew practice missions until the end of the war.  On 5 Oct 1945, it returned to Borinquen Field, Puerto Rico and carried out navigational training and photo missions of installations in the Caribbean perimeter.  Reduced to one officer and three enlisted, the squadron placed its aircraft in storage until its move without personnel and equipment to Rio Hato, Panama in 1946.  In Panama, it carried out a substantial number of tracking and tow-target missions each month for the coast artillery.  The squadron received its first jet aircraft FP-80As (later, RF-80As) on 18 Dec 1947 but lost its tow-target and radio control flight capabilities.  From Mar 1948 until its inactivation in Mar 1949, it flew training missions and reconnaissance missions in Central America.  From activation in Nov 1966-Nov 1969, it served as a replacement training unit for crews training in the RF-4C aircraft.  The squadron lost its mission of training new crews and became an operational reconnaissance squadron at the end of 1969.  From then until inactivation in Oct 1971, it flew reconnaissance training missions and maintained a worldwide mobility capability.

Service Streamers.  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers.  Afghanistan: Consolidation II; Consolidation III.  Iraq: Iraqi Governance.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers.  None.

Decorations.  Meritorious Unit Awards: 31 Jan-30 Apr 2005; 1 Oct 2010-30 Sep 2011; 1 Oct 2011-30 Jun 2012; 1 Jul 2012-30 Jun 2013; 1 Jul 2013-30 Jun 2014.  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards:  1 Jan 1968-30 Apr 1969; 1 Nov 1969-31 May 1971; 15 Jul-15 Oct 1971.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 2 Jun 2021.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 15 Oct 1971.

Supersedes statement prepared on 12 Jan 2016.   

Emblem.  Approved on 12 Mar 1943; latest rendering, 1 Feb 2010.

Prepared by Margaret Ream.