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58 OPERATIONS GROUP (AETC)

Posted 9/29/2009 Printable Fact Sheet

Lineage. Established as 58 Pursuit Group (Interceptor) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 16 Jan 1941. Redesignated as: 58 Fighter Group on 15 May 1942; 58 Fighter Group, Single Engine, on 20 Aug 1943. Inactivated on 27 Jan 1946. Redesignated as 58 Fighter-Bomber Group on 25 Jun 1952. Activated on 10 Jul 1952. Inactivated on 8 Nov 1957. Redesignated as 58 Tactical Missile Group on 17 Jun 1958. Activated on 15 Jul 1958. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 Mar 1962. Redesignated as 58 Operations Group, and activated, on 1 Oct 1991.
 
Assignments. Northeast Air District (later, First Air Force), 16 Jan 1941; 3 Interceptor Command, 2 Oct 1941; 1 Fighter Command, 17 Oct 1942; Fifth Air Force, 19 Nov 1943; 5 Fighter Command, by 6 Mar 1945; Far East Air Forces, 23 Nov 1945; Pacific Air Command, by 10-27 Jan 1946. 58 Fighter-Bomber Wing, 10 Jul 1952-8 Nov 1957. Fifth Air Force, 15 Jul 1958; 314 Air Division, 24 Apr 1959-25 Mar 1962. 58 Fighter (later, 58 Special Operations) Wing, 1 Oct 1991-.
 
Operational Components. Squadrons. 23 Flying Training (formerly, 23 Flying Training Flight): 1 Apr 1994-. 62 Fighter: 18 Mar-1 Apr 1994. 63 Fighter: 25 Feb 1993-1 Apr 1994. 67 Pursuit (later, 67 Fighter): 16 Jan 1941-3 Oct 1942. 68 Pursuit (later, 68 Fighter): 16 Jan 1941-3 Oct 1942. 69 Pursuit (later, 69 Fighter; 69 Fighter-Bomber): 16 Jan 1941-27 Jan 1946; 10 Jul 1952-8 Nov 1957. 71 Special Operations: 20 May 2005-. 310 Pursuit (later, 310 Fighter, 310 Fighter-Bomber, 310 Tactical Missile, 310 Tactical Fighter Training, 310 Fighter): 9 Feb 1942-27 Jan 1946; 10 Jul 1952-8 Nov 1957; 15 Jul 1958-25 Mar 1962; 1 Oct 1991-1 Apr 1994. 311 Pursuit (later, 311 Fighter, 311 Fighter-Bomber, 311 Tactical Fighter Training, 311 Fighter): 9 Feb 1942-27 Jan 1946; 10 Jul 1952-8 Nov 1957; 1 Oct 1991-1 Apr 1994. 314 Tactical Fighter Training (later, 314 Fighter): 1 Oct 1991-1 Apr 1994. 425 Fighter: 30 Dec 1992-1 Apr 1994. 461 Tactical Fighter Training (later, 461 Fighter): 1 Oct 1991-1 Apr 1994. 512 Special Operations (later, 512 Rescue): 1 Apr 1994-. 550 Special Operations: 1 Apr 1994-. 550 Tactical Fighter Training (later, 550 Fighter): 1 Oct-14 Nov 1991; 25 Mar-1 Apr 1994. 551 Special Operations: 1 Apr 1994-8 Dec 2007. 555 Tactical Fighter Training (later, 555 Fighter): 1 Oct-25 Mar 1994. 607 Air Control: 1 May 1992-1 Jul 1993.
 
Stations. Selfridge Field, MI, 15 Jan 1941; Baton Rouge, LA, 5 Oct 1941; Dale Mabry Field, FL, 4 Mar 1942; Richmond AAB, VA, 16 Oct 1942; Philadelphia Muni Aprt, PA, 24 Oct 1942; Bradley Field, CT, c. 3 Mar 1943; Green Field, RI, 28 Apr 1943; Grenier Field, NH, 16 Sep-22 Oct 1943; Sydney, Australia, 19 Nov 1943; Brisbane, Australia, 21 Nov 1943; Dobodura, New Guinea, 28 Dec 1943; Saidor, New Guinea, c. 3 Apr 1944; Noemfoor, 30 Aug 1944; San Roque, Leyte, 18 Nov 1944; San Jose, Mindoro, c. 30 Dec 1944; Mangaldan, Luzon, 5 Apr 1945; Porac, Luzon, 18 Apr 1945, Okinawa, 10 Jul 1945; Japan, 26 Oct 1945; Fort William McKinley, Luzon, 28 Dec 1945-27 Jan 1946. Taegu AB, South Korea, 10 Jul 1952; Osan-Ni (later, Osan) AB, South Korea, 15 Mar 1955-8 Nov 1957. Osan AB, South Korea, 15 Jul 1958-25 Mar 1962. Luke AFB, AZ, 1 Oct 1991; Kirtland AFB, NM, 1 Apr 1994-.
 
Commanders. Capt John M. Sterling, 15 Jan 1941-unkn; Maj Louis W. Chick Jr., Unkn; Col Gwen G. Atkinson, 8 Dec 1942; Lt Col Edward F. Roddy, 12 Mar 1945; Unkn Sep-Dec 1945; not manned, 28 Dec 1945-27 Jan 1946. Col Charles E. Jordan, 1952; Col Frederick J. Nelander, 1953; Col George V. Williams, 1954; Col William R. Brown, 1954; Col Clifford D. Nash, 1 Nov 1955-unkn. Lt. Col Chris J. H. Schaefer Jr., 15 Jul 1958; Lt Col Bowers W. Espy, 22 Apr 1959; Col Alex T. McSwain, 2 Sep 1959; Lt Col Gordon B. Compton, 1 Jul 1960; Lt Col Walter A. Gremban, c. Feb 1961; Col Francis B. Howes Jr., 17 Jul 1961; Lt Col Walter A Gremban, 7 Dec 1961; Lt Col Enos L. Commons, 28 Feb-25 Mar 1962. Col Steven R. Polk, 1 Oct 1991; Col Bron A. Burke, 15 Jun 1992; Col Neil A. Youngman, 1 Apr 1994; Col David A. Schantz, 23 Jun 1995; Col Dale A. Kissinger, 22 Apr 1996; Col John H. Folkerts, 9 Jul 1996; Col Jeffrey B. Harrison, 19 May 1997; Col Bernard V. Moore II, 9 Jul 1999; Col Bradley A. Heithold, 8 May 2001; Col Michael W. Callan, 24 May 2002; Col Paul R. Harmon, 19 Aug 2003; Col Leonard A. Smales, 28 Jun 2005; Col John J. Maubach, 2 Jul 2007; Col Robert K. Abernathy, 17 Jul 2009-.
 
Aircraft/Missiles. P-35, 1941-1943; P-36, 1941-1943; P-39, 1941-1943; P-40, 1941-1943; P-47, 1943-1945. F-84, 1952-1954; F-86, 1954-1957. TM-61C (Matador), 1958-1962. F-15, 1991-1994; F-16, 1991-1994; UH-1, 1994-; HH-60, 1994-; MH-53, 1994-2007; TH-53, 1994-2001; HC-130, 1994-1997, 2000-; MC-130, 1994-; C-12, 1999-2002; CV-22, 2006-; TH-1H, 2008-.
 
Operations. From beginning of World War II until 1943, served as replacement training unit for fighter pilots. Trained for combat and moved overseas to Southwest Pacific Theater in 1943. Began combat operations in Feb 1944, providing protection for U.S. bases and escorting transports initially, then escorting bombers over New Guinea and sea convoys to Admiralty Islands. From Noemfoor, bombed and strafed Japanese airfields and installations on Ceram, Halmahera, and the Kai Islands. Moved to the Philippines in Nov 1944, flew fighter sweeps against enemy airfields, supported U.S. ground forces, and protected sea convoys and transport routes. Earned a Distinguished Unit Citation (DUC) for strafing a Japanese naval force that was attacking a U.S. base on Mindoro on 26 Dec 1944. Beginning in Jul 1945, attacked railways, airfields, and enemy installations in Korea and Kyushu, Japan from Okinawa. After V-J Day, flew reconnaissance missions over Japan. Moved without personnel or equipment to the Philippines in Dec 1945 and was inactivated in Jan 1946. Activated in Korea during the Korean War, absorbed the personnel and equipment of the 136 Fighter-Bomber Group, then provided close air support for UN ground forces and attacked enemy airfields and installations. Having entered the war with slow, short-ranged F-84D ThunderJets, the 58 FBG transitioned in late 1952 to the new "G" model, designed with more speed and range. New targets included enemy ports, railroads, and airfields. The group attacked the major supply port of Sinuiju in September, inflicting heavy damage without loss of personnel or aircraft. Combining with other fighter-bomber units, it attacked the Kumgang Political School at Odong-ni in October 1952 and the North Korean tank and infantry school at Kangso in February 1953. In May, the 58 FBG bombed North Korean dams, flooding enemy lines of communication and rice fields. On July 27, 1953, attacked runway at Kanggye and, with the 49 FBG, bombed Sunan Airfield for the final action of fighter-bombers in the Korean War. Earned a second DUC for its actions in the last three months of the war. After the war, provided air defense for South Korea and deployed tactical components on rotational basis to Taiwan, Jan 1955-Feb 1957. In Oct 1958, armed with tactical missiles to provide air defense of South Korea until 1962. From Oct 1991, conducted combat crew training for F-15E aircrews and F-16 pilots; F-16C/D squadrons had a secondary, wartime mission of augmenting national air defenses. Early in 1993, added a mission of training international (Republic of Singapore) pilots in F-16 A/B aircraft, the first one arriving in Mar 1993. The next month, the group lost its wartime mission. In Apr 1994, gave up fighter pilot training function and moved without personnel or equipment from Luke to Kirtland AFB, NM, taking over the resources of the 542 Crew Training Wing (which inactivated). Trained aircrews in special operations and in search, rescue, and recovery. Additional missions included training pararescue and combat control teams, deploying personnel and equipment to support contingencies, and conducting search and rescue missions at request of local authorities. The 58 OG also accomplished all USAF undergraduate helicopter training via the 23 Flying Training Flight (later, Squadron) at Ft. Rucker, AL. On 11 Sep 2001, after terrorists hijacked four civilian airliners and flew three of them into buildings in New York and Washington, the group airlifted a federal task force to Pennsylvania to investigate the crash site of the fourth airliner. Deployed personnel to support combat operations in Afghanistan (2001-) and Iraq (2003-).
 
Service Streamers. World War II American Theater.
 
Campaign Streamers. World War II: Bismarck Archipelago; New Guinea; Leyte; Luzon; Southern Philippines; Western Pacific; Ryukyus; China Offensive; Air Offensive, Japan. Korea: Korea, Summer-Fall 1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea, Summer 1953.
 
Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers. None.
 
Decorations. Distinguished Unit Citations: Philippines, 26 Dec 1944; Korea, 1 May-27 Jul 1953. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Apr 1992-31 Mar 1994; 1 Jan 1993-30 Jun 1994; 1 Jul 1994-31 Dec 1995; 1 Jul 1996-30 Jun 1998; 1 Jul 1998-30 Jun 2000; 1 Jul 2001-30 Jun 2002; 1 Jul 2002-30 Jun 2003; 1 Jul 2003-30 Jun 2004; 1 Jul 2004-30 Jun 2005; 1 Jul 2006-30 Jun 2007; 1 Jul 2007-30 Jun 2008. Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (WWII). Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation: 10 Jul 1952-31 Mar 1953.
 
Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 11 Aug 2009.
 
Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 10 Aug 2009.
 
Supersedes statement prepared on 16 Aug 2005.
 
Emblem. Group will use the wing emblem with the group designation in the scroll.
 
Prepared by Patsy Robertson.
 
Reviewed by Daniel Haulman.







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